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Undergraduate Catalog

2012 - 2013

BS in Family Life: Human Development Emphasis
(46 hours*)



The Discipline

The human development emphasis centers on theories, research, and practices related to optimal human development within the context of family life. Human development scholarship provides a life-span perspective for understanding human development within the family context by helping students learn how children, youth, and adults develop, change, and face challenges throughout the life course (infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood). Our teaching strategy reflects a strong commitment to better critical thinking and problem solving skills as students become involved in mentored learning research, internships, and outreach experiences.

Careers

The program in human development is a broad, liberal arts training designed to assist students as they seek professional activity (as volunteers or for pay) in settings where knowledge of human development and behavior is valued. An emphasis in human development prepares graduates to make significant contributions locally (e.g., one's own family, church, and local community) and professionally (e.g., working in the community services professions, and as volunteers or paid professionals for worldwide human service-based organizations).

Some graduates with a human development emphasis are employed in community action centers, childcare centers, residential treatment centers, programs for the elderly, juvenile correction programs, and youth programs. Still other students prepare for volunteer-based community intervention (e.g., Habitat for Humanity, Red Cross, and The Muscular Dystrophy Association).

Additionally, a human development emphasis is an excellent undergraduate preparation for those pursuing graduate school in human development research. Others seek professional certification by obtaining advanced degrees in school counseling, special education, clinical gerontology, and clinical psychology.

For students who are interested in teaching opportunities in public schools, a major in early childhood education teacher certification is available through the Teacher Education Department in the McKay School of Education. This certification qualifies individuals to teach kindergarten through third grade in public and private schools. The human development emphasis provides foundation courses for those preparing to enter early childhood education teacher certification programs (see Teacher Education Department for a list of these courses).

In addition, an early childhood focus within the human development emphasis prepares students for vocations that do not require teacher certifications (e.g., Head Start).

Research Opportunities

Students are encouraged to work with professors on research projects that help them experience the "how to" of being a family scientist. Students may contact faculty individually, seek mentoring grants from the university, register for internships (the capstone course) that help them integrate classroom learning with real-world experience, and create projects of their own.

Preparation for Graduate Studies

Students who plan to attend graduate school are encouraged to take as many of the upper-division human development topic courses as possible. Other 300- and 400-level courses that emphasize human development or family studies will serve as a springboard to masters or PhD programs in human development, developmental psychology, and family studies related programs.

Internships

Contact the Family and Social Services Internship Office, 945 SWKT, (801) 422-2168, for information.

Clubs

School of Family Life Student Association (SFLSA)
Cougar FACS



Program Requirements    |    View MAP

  1. The School of Family Life requires a minimum of 18 hours of upper-division major course work to be taken in residency at BYU for this degree program. (This requirement includes taking at least 12 hours minimum of the human development core in residency at BYU.) These hours may also go toward BYU's 30-hour residency requirement for graduation.
  2. Complete the following School of Family Life core courses:
      SFL 100 : Strengthening Marriage and Family: Proclamation Principles and Scholarship. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      SFL 100 : Strengthening Marriage and Family: Proclamation Principles and Scholarship. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter; Spring; Summer
      DESCRIPTION: Understanding, applying, and sharing principles of successful marriage and family life from the LDS proclamation on the family, using sacred and scholarly perspectives.

      Course Outcomes


      SFL 101 : Introduction to School of Family Life. (1:1:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      SFL 101 : Introduction to School of Family Life. (1:1:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter
      DESCRIPTION: Required seminar for all students entering the major. Overview of curriculum and major requirements, faculty research programs and specialties, campus resources, future opportunities, and career possibilities.

      Course Outcomes


      SFL 160 : Introduction to Family Processes. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      SFL 160 : Introduction to Family Processes. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      OFFERED: Honors also; Independent Study also.
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter
      DESCRIPTION: Ways of strengthening family life by understanding such family processes as generations, emotions, communication, and rituals.

      Course Outcomes


      SFL 210 : Human Development. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      SFL 210 : Human Development. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      OFFERED: Independent Study also.
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter; Spring; Summer
      DESCRIPTION: Growth and development of the child from conception through adolescence; influences of family, peers, and schools.
      NOTE: This course is part of a GE Mosaic. See ge.byu.edu/mosaic-list for more information.

      Course Outcomes


      SFL 290 : Critical Inquiry and Research Methods. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      SFL 290 : Critical Inquiry and Research Methods. (3:3:0)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter; Spring; Summer
      PREREQUISITE: SFL 160 & SFL 210 & STAT 121
      DESCRIPTION: Philosophies of critical inquiry. Principles of designing, conducting, and reporting social science investigations.

      Course Outcomes


      STAT 121 : Principles of Statistics. (3:3:1)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      STAT 121 : Principles of Statistics. (3:3:1)(Credit Hours:Lecture Hours:Lab Hours)
      OFFERED: Independent Study also; Honors also.
      WHEN TAUGHT:Fall; Winter; Spring; Summer
      RECOMMENDED: MATH 110 or equivalent.
      DESCRIPTION:  Stemplots, boxplots, histograms, scatterplots; central tendency, variability; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing involving one and two means and proportions; contingency tables, simple linear regression.

      Course Outcomes
               
      : Honors Principles of Statistics.
      Course Outcomes



  3. Complete the following human development life-span core courses:
  4. Complete 6 hours from the following human development topic courses:
  5. Complete 9 hours of any SFL course as electives/prerequisites.
  6. Complete three hours of a capstone experience from the following:
  7. Note 1: If SFL 490 is not used to fulfill the capstone requirement, it may be used to fulfill 3 of the 9-hour elective/prerequisite requirements above.

    Note 2: For SFL 399R and 403R human development related experiences are preferred. Only 3 credit hours of 399R or 403R may count towards the 46-hour degree requirement. Additional credits may, however, count towards the overall 120-hour graduation requirement.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill university core requirements.



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